WHERE DO MOSQUITOES COME FROM?

Mosquitoes are jokingly referred to as the State Bird of Louisiana. However, they are not exclusive to our state. Mosquitoes are found all over the world, with the exception of Antarctica. They favor warmer, more humid climates and live closest to open bodies of water. Overall, there are approximately 2700 species of this little pest around the globe, with approximately 176 species inhabiting the US. They have been inhabiting the planet for approximately 400 million years, and have no immediate threat of becoming extinct. With over 1 million deaths per annum attributed to mosquito bites, they are considered to be the deadliest animal on Earth.

Female mosquitoes are the only ones that bite because they need the nutrients from the blood to produce their eggs. They are attracted to humans and animals because of the carbon dioxide, lactic acid, and body heat emitted through their breath and sweat. Mosquitoes are also attracted to a chemical compound known as octenol, which is utilized in mosquito control.

With the torrential rains we have been experiencing in Southeast Louisiana, standing rainwater is a breeding ground for these pesky insects. We all have vessels around our homes that collect rainwater, and need to be emptied after the rainfall has ended. Female mosquitoes lay their eggs in bodies of water along the shoreline within the grasses and cane. As the eggs hatch, they enter the larvae stage. Then they morph into pupae. The pupae grow into mosquitoes. Females live about 2-4 weeks, where males live only about 10 days. The lifecycle begins all over again.

Protect yourself, your family, and your pets with Terminix. We will come to your home for a no-obligation consultation. Our trained technicians will rid your home and yard of all pests. Our mission is to provide total customer satisfaction by providing tailored services to meet individual client needs. Call us at the Eastbank office at (504) 834-7330, the Westbank office at (504) 368-3680, the River Parishes at (985) 652-7378, or on the Northshore at (985) 643-6542.